Emmaus Lutheran Church - LCMS

Pastor David W. Kern
Worship Service: Sundays at 10 A.M.
Sunday School and Bible Class: Sundays at 9 A.M.

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Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ Jesus,


Sometimes admittedly, when reaching a point of writer's block, my mind allows me to drift to a game of solitaire on the computer. I try to tell myself that I am thinking through the point at which I have "stumbled." But according to various articles, a game such as solitaire affords exercising of the mind bringing about better focus, improved awareness, and better learning.


In a 2010 study at Harvard University, 11,430 men and women between the ages of 18 and 60 who were randomly assigned to one of three online brain exercise programs. One focused on reasoning, planning, and problem solving. Another focused on broader tasks of memory, attention, mathematics, and other skills. The third (the control) involved searching online for answers to obscure questions. After six weeks, people in the first and second groups boosted their scores on their assigned brain-training exercises. They showed no improvement (compared with the control group) when they repeated several general memory and thinking skills, testing that had been done at the start (www.health.harvard.edu/blog/can-computer-games-keep-your-brain-fit-201204264640 of October 28, 2020). But there does appear to be some validity in reasoning such interaction may improve cognitive skills.


I doubt seriously anyone would believe that would have been the goal of Microsoft, in putting those games on the computer, in the first place. In fact, there are an equal number of articles that speak to the game's addictive qualities as well.


Perhaps you are asking, "Pastor, where are you going with this?" St. Luke, when writing Acts of the Apostles (Acts 17:10-17), says that when Paul and Silas went to Berea teaching at the synagogue, "Many of them therefore believed, with not a few Greek women of high standing as well as men." This did not go over well with the Jewish leaders of that time and place, but of course the numbers of believers grew in numbers. These would not have been luke-warm Christians, but ones who "received the word with all eagerness, examining the Scriptures daily to see if these things were so."


In today's world, there is growing concern for the number of "luke-warm" Christians, those not energetic for hearing God's Word. Most every family, and many individuals have copies of the Bible in their possession, are not in the practice of daily reading. In some cases, they sit on a shelf or coffee-table, collecting dust. Likewise, then the minds of those who possess them, "collect dust," having little to stimulate their faith.


I challenge each of you to dust-off your Bible, taking time to read it daily. Like solitaire, I expect that not only will your cognitive skills become sharper, but your own faith will be strengthened as you "examine the Scriptures to see if these things are so."


In His grace,


Pastor


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